Skip to main content

I Donated My Hair, and You Can, Too!

Today I got an email notifying me that Wigs for Kids received my hair donation!



Wigs for Kids is a nonprofit which provides free wigs to children without natural hair. Getting a wig can give many kids more self-confidence about their appearance, helping them get through a difficult time. 

My hair was around 22 inches braided, probably making it a good 24 inches in length brushed out straight. It was a lot of hair. Although I have straight hair, people with any hair type or color -- including gray hair -- can donate, as long as the hair you're giving hasn't been dyed or chemically treated. They put the donated hair through a whole treatment process when making the wigs, so split ends and the like don't matter, either. 

I have no personal use for my long hair. I had made a resolution -- what, two years ago now? -- that I was going to grow out my hair for donation. It's bright blond and fine, and I have a lot of it. According to the hairdresser, it's also very similar to the texture of a child's hair. 

Wigs for Kids relies on donations to keep their wigs free, since the creation process can be costly. I will be sending them a donation in the mail later this month, once I pay my bills and rent. This month was tricky financially since I had to take my car to the shop, but I want to be helpful beyond just giving my hair. 

On a personal level, I'm glad to get rid of the hair. It was in the way. It was annoying. It made my personal hygiene routine longer and that much more tiring. I hated the way it made my face look. I disliked the ultra-feminine look of long blond hair, too. Looking at myself with the hair in the mirror every morning was like a punch to the gut, because I've had short hair my whole life and this was not me at all. It wasn't all bad, and it does seem like a weird thing to complain about, but I vastly prefer my new (old) short hair. 

Some kid will get a wig with hair they will appreciate more than I did. That's a good thing. 

You can donate your hair, too! Check here to see if you meet their donation requirements. :)

Comments

  1. It's been three years since I chopped off all mine, though it wasn't nearly as long as yours. Short hair is nice and easy. Plus I like to dye it different colors, and having it short means I can switch it often. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh, neat! Yep, all I do now is dry it and maybe put a little mousse in it or something.
      Dyeing can be a lot of fun. It does seem like it would be waaaay easier to dye with short hair; I didn't consider that.

      Delete
  2. I agree that long hair can be tiresome to take care of. Mine is short right now and I want to explore that. Though I kinda want it to get a little longer. So wonderful you donated hair Laura. I'm glad to see you so happy in this post. Maybe you found the way to put a pep back in your step all on your own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does kind of feel like a weight has been lifted. I joked to the hairdresser that I was about to lose 3 pounds, haha. There's a lot to play with in terms of short and medium styles! Hope you find a look you like. :)

      Delete
  3. Cool! I've never had healthy enough or long enough hair to donate it, but I've always loved the idea! What a cool thing to be able to do. :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :) I thought about growing it out to do again, but...ugh. I didn't like long hair at all. Idk about hair health, that's something I didn't consider. They gave me the impression that the chemical treatment process takes care of that. But yeah, it does have to be, what, 12 inches at least?

      Delete

Post a Comment

Comments make me happy, so leave lots! :) I will usually reply to each one, so click Notify Me to read my replies.

Popular posts from this blog

What if Iago was a Woman?

For all that I'm a theatre major, I hardly ever talk about acting on this blog. But this project is so cool and fantastic and awesome and wicked that I just have to take a minute and tell you about it. What if Iago was a woman? For those of you who don't know, Iago is a villain in Shakespeare's tragedy Othello. He is considered one of the worst, most evil antagonists in all of Shakespeare.  Plot summary: Othello is a Moor, which in those days referred to someone from Africa. He, a black man, marries Desdemona, a white woman. Society flips its shit, but they can't exactly do anything because he's the General of the Venetian navy and there's a war on. Desdemona, unable to stay with her angry father, goes with Othello to Cyprus, which is in rebellion. A storm sinks the enemy navy and our good guys arrive safely. Iago, though, is not happy. Because Othello passed him over for promotion (and assorted other reasons that all amount to "I just want to fuck sh

Missing people around the holidays

This winter is highly unusual for many of us because of the pandemic. The holidays are often a trauma trigger in any case, beyond the simple stress of preparing the celebrations. For example, some people have bad memories of spending holidays with abusive people, while others have to deal with the grief of experiencing their first holiday without a deceased loved one.  This winter, so many people are spending their holidays sick or without those who have died from COVID-19. One of my friends used to make and boost threads about being kind to yourself around the holidays, geared towards those for whom the season is a grief/trauma anniversary. This year, my grandfather died. Later this year, that friend died. Every time I think of all the people who didn't survive 2020, I think of them and how fucking unfair that feels. In 2020, we weren't able to hold a funeral for my grandfather. The social rituals around death, designed to help us deal with it, have been disrupted. Distance is

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow by Faïza Guène, a YA Book By A Young Author

Review time! Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow is a young adult novel by a young adult, so I was very interested to read it. There's also a #MuslimShelfSpace tag going around, and this review is a nod to that. The idea is that there's been a lot of stereotypes and anti-Muslim sentiment spread around, so buying and boosting books about and by Muslims can help educate people and break down harmful stereotypes.  The author is French with an Algerian background, and  Guène  wrote Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow when she was in her late teens. Although the novel is not autobiographical, she shares many things with its main character. Doria, like her creator, is the child of immigrants and lives in poor suburban housing projects.   Guène   wrote that she realized girls like herself weren't really represented in books, and felt that Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow was a way to tell the stories of people in the suburbs who are ignored by the elites of French literature. Plot: Life Sucks, Until It Doesn