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Finally: Graduation

Yesterday, I graduated from college with my B.A.

Hooray!

Finally. Thank God. 

I wish that I could say college was the "best four years of my life," like people kept telling me it was going to be, but first of all I hate that saying, and second of all, it wasn't. It was good, of course, but it wasn't the best. Trying to classify parts of your life as "best" just leaves you constantly disappointed. So I try not to think of things in terms of "best."

I had a post planned out about things I did and learned while in college, but I'd like to keep some of that to myself for now. 

I started this blog as a freshman. Somehow, I managed to keep it up. If I could do it again, I'd rename it something less cheesy and more truthful. The "voices" in the title were meant to refer to the different characters I had knocking around in my head -- yet, specifics about my writing are one of the things I hardly ever talk about on here.

When I examine myself, I'm sometimes surprised to think that I write a blog at all. I'm more internally focused. I don't like sharing personal things even to friends with whom I am close, let alone strangers online. A lot of what I write here reads as shallow to me compared to other bloggers who regularly bare their souls in their posts and wear their hearts on their sleeves. 

I keep feeling like the college will call me and tell me that I forgot to do something, or that I'll wake up back in the fall semester of junior year (aka: Hell). I'll start believing I've graduated in a week or so, when I continue to wake up in my parents' house and not my dorm room.

And then I'll go back to graduate school.

And keep writing. And doing other things. And, finally, getting around to beta-reading everything from my CP's. Seriously, though, the incentive of finally being able to get back to their manuscripts really helped motivate me to grit my teeth, finish my final requirements, and graduate. I like beta-reading. If any of them are reading this, thank you for writing your stories and sharing them with me.

What's next? I have only a general idea. First, though, I have to unpack.

Comments

  1. Congratulations!

    I had one professor who also eschewed the whole notion of it being by default "the best years of your life". In essence he said that it's one of the final times that most of your movements are judged so closely by the standards of someone else's views of success, and that afterward throughout life you answer more to yourself, even as you tackle different responsibilities.

    I had some fun in college as well, occasionally a great thing or two happened, but it was far from the best years of my life..and in certain categories it was the opposite.

    As for this blog, you're to be commended for still doing it regularly, heart-on-sleeve or not. Most people can't do it. It sounds like no big deal, but it is we bloggers who can say that it isn't always easy to provide consistent content to such places. So, well done on that account as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I once considered dropping the blog, and it's been less consistent at times, but I'm glad I kept it up. It used to be busier, and now it's not. I'm not sure if it's a content issue or if it's because most of the freshmen and high school bloggers I connected with early on stopped blogging. Either way, I'm still over here blogging away...doing my thing.

      I'll agree that in certain categories college was the opposite of the best year of my life. I think my generation has a lot of uncertainty when it comes to college, what with the recession and the competition these days. I certainly don't regret my college education; I'm thankful for lessons learned but it was no party.

      Thanks for dropping by! Have a good week.

      Delete

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