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The Summer Without Internet

Some of you may have been wondering where I've been all this summer. I've barely posted any reviews to examiner, I've been completely absent from here, and I said I was going to do that Ready. Set. Write! thing.

Unfortunately, I haven't had Internet access for most of the summer. Sigh.

This is probably the part where I'm supposed to wax eloquent about what a relief it was not to be so busy and connected, and how being shut off from social media and the web was a blessing in disguise. I've read enough posts about taking Internet breaks; I know how it goes.

Something-something, enlightenment, the corruption of the modern world...
Well, it wasn't. I understand Internet breaks, but I'll be very happy to get my Internet back. It's been annoying at best and at worst, has interfered with my job. I couldn't email my supervisor (or my mother), or go online to check important life kinds of things without taking myself to the library (where I am now). And with two jobs, I haven't had a lot of time to go to the library during regular hours. I couldn't check email for updates on grad school. I know, I know, first world problems. But I hate being cut off from my writing, entertainment, and news sources. Perhaps that makes me petty and shallow like all the kids nowadays. Personally, I just think I like being connected. I especially dislike getting news by word-of-mouth from people with no idea what they are talking about, with no way for me to fact-check.

I've hated not having Internet. My roommate was supposed to set up our account back in June. June. She volunteered to do it because she had a phone with Internet access, so it was easiest for her to do. The thing is, because her phone had Internet, it wasn't exactly as urgent an issue for her. We got our account in mid-July-ish and we're finally getting our cable outlet installed. We were supposed to get that done Friday, but the techs never showed up. We get a discount, fortunately, but I'd rather just have my Internet.

Anyway, this has all been a valuable life lesson in living without Internet and with roommates. Adulthood. Yay.

Not that Internet is essential. Clearly I've been surviving without it, mainly by crocheting and reading a lot. (And drinking.) If I'd bothered, I probably could have gotten it all set up a lot earlier. Just like I could have mowed the yard today. Oh, well.

So, what have I been up to?

I am currently working two jobs, though I'll have to drop one when school starts again in September. I'll miss the extra money, but I'll probably appreciate the extra time for reading and homework. I'm living off-campus in a house with two roommates and no pets. It also has a yard, which I simultaneously hate and like to mow. I'm getting all my drinking and partying out of the way over the summer. I gained some weight, which my mother is only too eager to point out every time I see her. I lost some weight, too, but since I'm still over 110 pounds, my mother feels the need to point out that I've gained weight.

I'm looking forward most to my Stage Combat class, though less so to getting up at 7:30 AM for it. I'm beginning to feel the panic setting in as classes approach. I'm reading a lot -- a lot of dark fiction, oddly, seeing as how I typically read lighter stuff in the summer. I'm barely writing, though I do knit a lot. I also broke up with my boyfriend -- who has finally stopped texting me. The unfortunate part of that situation was that my phone doesn't allow me to see who sends a text without opening it. Grr.

And...that's about it with me. OH WAIT RIGHT and I'm watching The Legend of Korra. If you aren't, then you should be. Actually, I'm going to go catch up right now, while I'm still at the library.

Have a good week, blog readers!

*crickets*

Comments

  1. Welcome (almost) back. Nice to see a post again!

    I think it's almost a fad at times to be "unconnected" and be away from the internet. I'm not saying there are no benefits to unplugging for a while, but I think it's sometimes elevated to moral high ground by some people. "I got off of the internet for a week, and I feel so much more at ease with life and the universe." If that's true, great for them. But like you I see it as a way of remaining connected with other people, with information, with news, and so on. I don't feel like Buddha or anything when I go without internet for several days or longer. I just feel like I'm dealing with a pain in the ass.

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  2. Thanks, and thanks for stopping by to comment!

    I do have Internet at my house now. Hooray! And yes, I do agree that it's become something of a fad to unplug. Not that it can't be a good, beneficial thing at times, but like you said, the importance some people give it seems a bit much.

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